Pay Teachers More

Pay Teachers More

This page contains links to financial analyses of the most common Opportunity Culture models and a detailed guide to establishing Opportunity Culture pay and career paths structures. Savings and cost calculations of the common models—Elementary Subject Specialization, Multi-Classroom Leadership, and Time-Technology Swap Rotation—illustrate that schools could increase excellent teachers’ pay up to approximately 130 percentwithout increasing class sizes and within available budgets.

Pilot sites are already paying excellent teachers sustainable supplements of 10 to 50 percent of average pay, and some schools are paying supplements to effective teachers for joining teams that extend reach collaboratively. In some variations, schools may pay all teachers more, sustainably.


Step-by-step pay and career paths guide:

 Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide—full guide; summary: Walks a district through the steps of designing Opportunity Culture pay and career paths, with an overview of key Opportunity Culture concepts, and assistance for evaluating the impact of different compensation design choices. The summary provides a brief overview and graphics that show how pay and career paths work at a glance.


Financial analyses to show how higher pay is funded sustainably:

 Financial Planning Summary: Describes the expected savings and costs of implementing reach models. This summary covers all model categories and includes a summary table.


School Models Financial Planning:

 Financial Planning for Elementary Subject Specialization

 Financial Planning for Multi-Classroom Leadership

 Financial Planning for Time-Technology Swap—Rotation

 Financial Planning for Secondary-Level Time-Technology Swap + Multi-Classroom Leadership

 Multi-Classroom Leader Team Staffing and Pay Example

 

See a PDF of the following tables here.

Elementary Table

Note 1. Figures expressed as “percentage more than average pay.” Schools save more when starting with higher percentages of non-classroom specialists, because savings are higher per class as these teachers’ positions are shifted back into classroom roles.
Note 2. In some districts, non-classroom positions may be paid for out of the district budget rather than school-level budgets. The district should work with schools designing Opportunity Culture models to allow them to reallocate those positions.
Note 3. Some portion of savings may be reallocated to all teaching staff or other priorities, not just excellent teachers. We present two example figures in the Multi-Classroom Leadership column when paying team teachers 10% and 25% more than average, which are modeled in the companion brief.
Note 4. See the following briefs for detailed calculations and multiple scenarios of net savings and pay increase potential, including data sources: Financial Planning for Elementary Subject Specialization, Financial Planning for Multi-Classroom Leadership, and Financial Planning for Time-Technology Swap— Rotation Model.

 

Secondary Tables

Note 1. These assume a reduction in 2 to 4 non-classroom specialists, depending on the scenario.
Note 2. Some portion of savings may be reallocated to all teaching staff or other priorities, not just teachers who extend their reach.
Note 3. The number of class periods teachers teach affects both the pay increases and number of new free periods that reach models provide to teachers. See Financial Planning for Secondary-Level Time-Technology Swap + Multi-Classroom Leadership for detailed calculations and multiple scenarios of net savings and pay increase potential, including data sources.

 

More help:

 Six Ways to Pay All Teachers More Within Budget

 How Digital Instruction Enables Higher Pay

 Teacher Pay & Career Advancement—A Leader’s Guide

 

Other Financial Planning Resources:

Additional resources for reallocating spending to support better student learning include the following:

Education Resource Strategies (ERS) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping urban school systems organize talent, time, and money to create great schools at scale. Learn more about how to reallocate resources to support strategic school designs that extend teacher reach on their website: http://www.erstrategies.org/strategies/school_design

The Center on Reinventing Public Education has published numerous reports about public school spending and has a web page devoted to finance, spending, and productivity: http://www.crpe.org/finance-and-productivity